Have you ever considered a vocation to the priesthood or the religious life?

Thursday, March 18, 2010

Archbishop: Priests can help recapture Lord's Day

Archbishop Timothy M. Dolan, the personable and joyful leader of the Archdiocese of New York, took the opportunity in a St. Patrick's Day letter to encourage the faithful in his archdiocese to return to Sunday Mass.

In his informative, yet playful letter, the archbishop explains the history of Sunday Mass and why it is so important. He also succinctly shoots down the many excuses the faithful have for missing Sunday Mass.

The letter is not just addressed to the faithful, but to priests. In it, Archbishop Dolan points out the important role priests play in leading the faithful to honoring the Lord's Day:

In this Year for Priests, we have heard marvellous testimonies from Catholics about how much they love their priests, and how much they appreciate the hard work they do for the sake the Gospel. Too often, the priest’s work is thankless task, but in this year our priests have heard their people thunder thank you! I add my voice to that chorus of gratitude!

If we are to recapture our sense of the Lord’s Day, our priests will lead us. We often hear people tease their priests that they only work one day a week – Sunday! That’s in good fun, for parishioners know that a priest’s work in never done, but there is something to that. For Sunday is the day of our greatest work. It is the Lord’s work, and we are at our most priestly when we consecrate the Lord’s Day by leading the people in the Lord’s own sacrifice. Many priests, who prudently begin preparing their Sunday homilies early in the week, are always thinking about the next Sunday. They live from Sunday to Sunday as it were, their eyes fixed during the week on the Lord’s Day to come. Our priests need to share that sense of Sunday with their parishioners, so that the Church as a whole lives from Sunday to Sunday.

Click HERE to read the entire letter.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Please observe these guidelines when commenting:

We want to host a constructive but civil discussion. With that in mind we ask you to observe these basics of civilized discourse:

1. No name calling or personal attacks; stick to the argument, not the individual.

2. Assume the goodwill of the other person, especially when you disagree.

3. Don't make judgments about the other person's sinfulness or salvation.

4. Within reason, stick to the topic of the thread.

5. If you don't agree to the rules, don't post.

We reserve the right to block any posts that violate our usage rules. And we will freely ban any commenters unwilling to abide by them.

Our comments are moderated so there may be a delay between the time when you submit your comment and the time when it appears.